January 2019 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
    Aug 10, 2020  
January 2019 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Undergraduate Course Descriptions


 

Human Resources

  
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    HR 220 - Human Resource Information Systems


    This course provides a foundation for the data entry, data tracking, and data information needs of human resources, payroll, management, and accounting functions within a business. Topics covered include managing employee records, technology portals, employee orientation, and compensation management. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 45.00 Prerequisites: HR 100 Introduction to Human Resource Management .  Corequisite: None.
  
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    HR 230 - Employment Law and Labor Relations


    Students in this course explore collective bargaining and labor relations, with an emphasis on real-world situations. There is also a strong emphasis on the historical and legal basis for labor relations and collective bargaining in the United States. Topics include labor relations, the collective bargaining process, and labor contracts. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 45.00 Prerequisites: BU 206 Business Law I  and HR 100 Introduction to Human Resource Management . Corequisite: None.
  
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    HR 310 - Compensation and Benefits


    This course will examine compensation models and discuss how to design and administer a compensation system that permits the organization to operate profitably. Topics include employee benefits, benefits administration, pay and compensation, and legislation. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 45.00 Prerequisite: HR 100 Introduction to Human Resource Management  or HR 230 Employment Law and Labor Relations . Corequisite: None.
  
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    HR 320 - Training and Development


    This course will provide an overview of training and development within the business enterprise. Topics include measurement, design, identifying employee and management development goals, developing employee advancement plans, employee retention, mentoring, and coaching. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 45.00 Prerequisite: HR 100 Introduction to Human Resource Management . Corequisite: None.
  
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    HR 330 - Risk Management


    This course focuses on how risks are managed by organizations. Topics include identification and quantification of risks, key legislations, legal principles of insurance and risks, methods of handling risks, common contracts for managing risks, and safety and security as they relate to organizational risk and ethical concerns. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 45.00 Prerequisite: HR 100 Introduction to Human Resource Management . Corequisite: None.
  
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    HR 340 - Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) Essentials


    This course provides an overview of ADR principles. Topics include how to use principled and ethical negotiation to mediate disputes as well as how to develop practical skills and techniques needed to resolve disputes effectively and with confidence. Students will be given tools for managing conflict constructively in the workplace and at home. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 45.00 Prerequisite: HR 100 Introduction to Human Resource Management . Corequisite: None.
  
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    HR 410 - Strategic Staffing


    This course provides strategies for managing human resources. Students will discuss techniques for human resource planning, recruiting and selecting, training, and retaining employees. Topics include human resource measurement, managerial ethics,  sustainability, job analysis techniques, and personality assessments. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 45.00 Prerequisites: HR 230 Employment Law and Labor Relations , HR 310 Compensation and Benefits , and HR 320 Training and Development . Corequisite: None.

Homeland Security

  
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    HS 100 - Introduction to Homeland Security


    This course provides a basic overview of homeland security, including the creation of the Department of Homeland Security, the homeland security transformation, homeland security strategies and initiatives, and legal issues related to homeland security. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 45.00 Prerequisites/Corequisites: None
  
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    HS 150 - Introduction to Cybersecurity


    This course introduces students to the world of cybersecurity and its significance in protecting our nation. Special attention is given to cybercrime investigations, hackers, viruses, and prevention techniques. This course is designed for students working or seeking employment in the fields of homeland security and criminal justice. 3.00 semester credit hours. Contact Hours: 45.00. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None.
  
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    HS 205 - Domestic and International Terrorism


    This course provides an introduction to the methods utilized by a terrorist or a terrorist group, including the hierarchical structure, an introduction to the methods utilized for training, funding, and gathering intelligence, the operational phases of a terrorist attack, and the process of target selection. Students will examine foreign and domestic terrorist organizations and the organization’s primary spheres of influence and ideologies, methods of funding, past terrorist attacks, and the potential for attack against U.S. interests, both domestically and globally. 4.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisites/Corequisites: None
  
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    HS 211 - Domestic Terrorism


    This course examines domestic terrorism and extremist groups operating within the United States. Special attention is given to the topics of boarder security, jihadist networks, government organization and communication, and domestic policies. 3.00 semester credit hours. Contact Hours: 45.00. Prerequisite: HS 100 Introduction to Homeland Security . Corequisite: None
  
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    HS 220 - International Terrorism


    This course examines international terrorism and counter-terrorism techniques. Students will explore current issues relating to the war on terror, understand jihadi influences, and explore reputable threats to the United States. Special attention will also be given to the Department of Homeland Security and their ongoing challenge in combating and preventing terrorist threats. 3.00 semester credit hours. Contact Hours: 45.00. Prerequisite: HS 100 Introduction to Homeland Security . Corequisite: None
  
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    HS 320 - Critical Incident Stress Management


    This course covers both basic and advanced knowledge and the suggested skills required to provide effective group crisis intervention services. Students are introduced to the methods and techniques of crisis intervention employed by law enforcement officers. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 45.00 Prerequisite: PS 101 Psychology . Corequisite: None.
  
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    HS 411 - Risk Assessment


    This course explores the challenges and benefits of conducting threat and vulnerability assessments. Students will learn how to assess critical infrastructures, natural resources, and other possible terrorist targets. Emphasis will be placed on identifying threats, methods of assessing threats, analyzing targets, and implementing approaches to risk assessment. 3.00 semester credit hours. Contact Hours: 45.00 Prerequisite: HS 211 Domestic Terrorism  and HS 220 International Terrorism . Corequisite: None
  
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    HS 491 - Homeland Security Capstone Project


    This course allows students to analyze and apply knowledge to a real-life domestic homeland security event. Students will complete a research paper relating to the event and apply knowledge gained throughout the criminal justice and homeland security program. Students are required to make a professional presentation of their project highlighting their analysis and findings. 4.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 75.00 Prerequisite: Final semester. Corequisite: None.
  
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    HS 494 - Internship


    This is an elective course in programs that students take in their final semester. The career internship course is designed for students interested in pursuing a career in homeland security and its related fields. The outcome of the internship is an informed student fully apprised of the opportunities his/her degree program offers for professional growth. During the internship phase of training, the student will experience various aspects of working in the actual field in which the student has been educated. The internship is designed to provide the student with the opportunity to experience and participate in duties typical of a contemporary workplace setting. Student learning will center on observing experienced personnel as well as participating in actual hands-on procedures under close supervision of trained professionals. Note: Online students in some states may not be allowed to take this internship due to state restrictions. Enrollment in a student readiness training is required prior to the internship course. Successful completion of training is required prior to internship course enrollment.

     

      4.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 180.00 Prerequisites: Final semester. Corequisite: None.


Humanities

  
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    HU 140 - Cultural Diversity


    This course will explore the construction, evolution, and application of categories and stereotypes related to the concept of the “other.”  Students will study discrimination, or “othering,” and how it operates in our contemporary culture among members of marginalized groups, including the categories of ethnicity, gender, socio-economic status, and inclusivity.  In addition, students will explore cultural diversity in a global context. In order to understand what it means to be human, students will analyze relevant historical and contemporary cultural texts through the lens of the Humanities to examine the importance of embracing cultural difference.  Cultural texts may include: works of literature, drama, and poetry; music; theatre; film; advertisement; visual art; architecture; and more. 3.00 semester credit hours. Contact Hours: 45. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None.
  
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    HU 240 - Introduction to Humanities


    This course allows students to explore the ways in which history, visual art, religion, literature, ideas, and music have shaped and continue to shape human experience.  Students will engage with a variety of humanities texts and engage in reflective writing which analyzes their own experience within a sociocultural context.  Students may also study the development of ideas related to philosophy and critical thinking about the individual and society. 3.00 semester credit hours. Contact Hours: 45. Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None.
  
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    HU 340 - Humanities and Contemporary Popular Culture


    This course builds on Introduction to Humanities and continues exploring how visual art, philosophy, music, religion, literature, and modern popular culture influence the formation of the individual and the cultural beliefs and social values evident in the world around us.  Students will use analysis skills to examine artifacts of popular culture from multiple perspectives, including examples from among these possible areas of analysis: social media and cyber-culture, popular music, contemporary literature, film, television, magazines, videos, advertising, and graphic novels. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 45. Prerequisite: HU 240 Introduction to Humanities   Corequisite: None.

Information Systems

  
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    IS 102 - Computers and Application Software


    This course provides an introduction to basic computer functions and applications software. The topics covered include loading and saving files, as well as using common software packages, including word processing software, spreadsheets, presentation software, and personal information management software. 4.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisites/Corequisites: None.
  
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    IS 119 - Current and Emerging Trends in Technology


    This course introduces students to current and emerging technologies that have significance in business and industry and the related areas of employment. Students will conduct research to identify strategies and techniques for finding critical information regarding the current and emerging technologies and their impacts on related jobs. Students will use this research to devise plans for preparing and adjusting to those changes, as if they were employed in such jobs, through updating their skills or transitioning to other related fields. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 45.00 Prerequisite: IS 102 Computers and Application Software . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 120 - Word Processing


    This course presents the practical application of the concepts and features of a leading word processor. Topics include formatting text and documents, creating and formatting tables, working with graphics, integrating information with other programs, managing styles and templates, working with columns, merging documents, file management techniques, creating forms, and creating web documents. 4.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 102 Computers and Application Software . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 122 - Programming Logic


    This course provides instruction in fundamental object-oriented programming concepts. Topics include problem solving and algorithm development, programming standards, variables, data types, operators, decisions, repetitive statements, modularity, methods, attributes, objects, classes, arrays, file I/O, and software testing and debugging, all within an object-oriented programming framework. Concepts may be introduced with a visual tool. Topics are demonstrated and implemented in a higher-level contemporary language such as Java or C#. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisites/Corequisites: None.
  
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    IS 123 - Computer Networks


    This course provides instruction in network design and technologies using the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) model. Topics include network fundamentals, the OSI model, network operating systems, TCP/IP fundamentals and utilities, network installation and upgrades, network remote access configuration and protocols, network administration and security, fault tolerance and disaster recovery considerations and procedures, and network troubleshooting procedures. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisites/Corequisites: None.
  
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    IS 124 - Database Applications


    This course provides the study of the principles and features of a leading desktop database management system. Topics include creating and managing databases, data management and integrity, working with queries and forms, managing reports, using tools and macros, databaseand file management, analyzing and filtering data, relational databases, and linking databases to the web. 4.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: MO 111 Computer Software Applications in Healthcare  or IS 102 Computers and Application Software . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 127 - Internet Foundation


    This course describes the history, architecture, and development of the World-Wide Web. Tagging languages such as XHTML and XML are introduced along with scripting languages such as JavaScript. Topics also include popular web page authoring tools, design, graphic and multimedia formats, and commerce, implementation, and security issues. Project: Static website. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: None: Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 128 - Object-Oriented Programming 1


    The goal of this course is to introduce the student to the design, implementation, and maintenance of event-driven software systems using an object-oriented approach. Common ways of organizing data are discussed such as basic data structures, class design and modeling, exception handling, file I/O, and database processing techniques. In addition, object-oriented concepts, such as inheritance, encapsulation, and polymorphism, are discussed and utilized in this course. A higher-level language such as Visual Basic, C#, and Java are used for implementation and illustration. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 122 Programming Logic . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 160 - Spreadsheets


    This course presents the practical application of the concepts and features of a leading spreadsheet package. Topics include using and managing worksheets and workbooks, applying formatting and style features, working with data, formulas, and functions, managing charts and graphics, working with outlines, views, and reports, automating tasks with the macro feature, using auditing tools, collaborative tools, and hyperlinks, and integrating with other programs. 4.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 102 Computers and Application Software . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 165 - Programming in Java I


    The focus of this course is the study of the Java Programming language, with an emphasis on introducing the basic concepts of object orientation and the basic structure and framework of a Java program. Topics include object-oriented program development, defining, creating, and using objects, communicating through methods, working with applets, the Java development environment and coding conventions, variables, data types, and operators, conditionals and loops, strings and string processing, and an introduction to one-dimensional arrays and array processing. 4.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 122 Programming Logic . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 171 - Visual Basic I


    This course provides instruction on how to create desktop applications using Visual Basic. Topics include designing applications, using variables, selection and repetition structures, sequential access files, menus and reports, dialog boxes and error trapping, random access files, database access and variable arrays, COM and ActiveX, and optimization, deployment, maintenance, and support. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 122 Programming Logic . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 183 - Database Concepts and Applications I


    This course provides an introduction to fundamental principles and guidelines for designing, developing, and implementing secure relational databases. Topics include: Database as a Service (DBaaS); entity relationships as foundations of relational database design; ensuring data integrity; the use of standard SQL as a means of developing complex queries; and the use of comparison operators to customize data presentation for reporting. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 122 Programming Logic . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 187 - Computer Architecture and Troubleshooting I


    This course provides instruction in microcomputer software and hardware concepts using the latest technology and troubleshooting techniques. Topics include the function and purpose of hardware and software, system board components and memory management, working with floppy and hard drives, supporting input and output devices, multimedia technology, supporting operating systems, printers, and notebook computers, troubleshooting fundamentals, applying disaster-recovery techniques and developing maintenance plans, and working with networks and the Internet. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisites/Corequisites: None.
  
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    IS 188 - Computer Architecture and Troubleshooting II


    This course provides instruction in IT infrastructure-related topics that include personal computer elements, portable devices, network operating systems, printers and imaging devices, networks and network security, safety and environmental issues, and professionalism. It covers the material required to pass the CompTIA IT technician A+ certification exam. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 187 Computer Architecture and Troubleshooting I . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 192 - Linux Administration


    This course introduces the capabilities and features of Linux as a multi-user operating system. Topics include planning and installing a Linux system, using and managing desktop interfaces, working with Linux shells and text files, performing system administration and management tasks such as file system management, application, process, and module management, network services installation and configuration, system security evaluation and enhancement, performance tuning, and troubleshooting techniques. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 123 Computer Networks . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 210 - Discrete Structures for Computer Science


    This course covers the fundamental mathematical concepts used in computer science. Topics include numbering systems, sets, relations, functions, counting, induction and recursion, trees, and logic. There is an emphasis on applications in computer science. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 45.00 Prerequisites: IS 122 Programming Logic  and MA 109 College Algebra . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 214 - SQL Server Administration


    This course provides instruction in the planning, installation, and administration of a leading SQL Server database management system. Topics include planning SQL Server capacity and security, installing and configuring the SQL Server, security configuration and management, data maintenance and management, monitoring performance, and troubleshooting various problems. 4.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: NT 181 Network and Server Operating Systems . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 217 - Introduction to SQL


    This course provides the student with an introductory look at SQL fundamentals and features. Topics include an introduction to SQL, single and multiple table queries, updating data, database administration, and reports. 4.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 102 Computers and Application Software . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 219 - Database Concepts and Applications II


    This course continues instruction in designing, developing, and implementing secure relational databases. Topics include: advanced techniques for queries, forms, and reports in an event-driven environment; in-depth coverage of structuring databases using object oriented concepts of properties and methods of classes and objects; techniques for debugging, error handling, and optimizing database applications, client and server strategies, transaction processing, multi-user applications, replication; Internet integration, and security. 3.00 Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 183 Database Concepts and Applications I . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 223 - Object-Oriented Programming 2


    This course focuses on using object-oriented programming languages such as Java, C#, C++, or Visual Basic in the development of modern business applications. Topics include object-oriented design using UML, encapsulation, object interfaces, inheritance, aggregation, abstract classes, polymorphism, user interfaces and database access along with advanced file I/O. Using object-oriented techniques to help manage complexity, improve communication among project stakeholders, and adapt to change are explored. Current software modeling and integrated development environments are demonstrated. Project: Development of a business application. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 128 Object-Oriented Programming 1 . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 227 - Legacy Systems Introduction


    This course introduces legacy technologies and programming languages, which are still widely used. Maintenance strategies for these technologies are explored. Integration with newer technologies are discussed and compared. Replacement technologies are analyzed for feasibility and effectiveness. Some basic features of older technologies are introduced and contrasted. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 122 Programming Logic . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 228 - C++ Programming


    This course provides an introduction to the C++ programming language for those students that have already been successful with fundamental object-oriented programming language concepts. After demonstrating the syntax for implementing the fundamental concepts in C++, advanced topics, such as pointers, operator overloading, preprocessing, and templates, are covered. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 223 Object-Oriented Programming 2 . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 239 - TCP/IP


    The focus of this course is to provide comprehensive working knowledge of the concepts essential to the practice of TCP/IP networking and TCP/IP administration. Topics include network addresses, names, implementation issues, internetwork architectures, models, conceptual tools, TCP/IP Internet and routing protocols, FTP, TFTP, Telnet, r-utilities, resource sharing, distributed computing, TCP/IP internetwork management with DNS and DHCP, troubleshooting and security, intranets, extranets, and Internet commerce. 4.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 123 Computer Networks . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 259 - Web Scripting


    This course presents the concepts and syntax of JavaScript programming for adding dynamic content and interactive elements to web pages. Topics include JavaScript programming fundamentals, integrating JavaScript and HTML, creating pop-up windows, adding scrolling messages, validating forms, enhancing the use of image and form objects, and using cookies, arrays, and frames. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 127 Internet Foundation . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 273 - Introduction to Computer Security


    This course is a survey of information and computer security. Topics include security standards and policies, common threats and risk management, disaster recovery planning, security architectures and design principles, access control, and network security. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 123 Computer Networks . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 283 - Network Security


    This course introduces basic security principles, such as establishing an effective security policy, and the different types of hacker activities that are most likely to be encountered. It will instruct the student in the latest security industry recommendations and how to properly protect leading OS servers in a variety of settings as well as how to conduct security audits. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisites: IS 192 Linux Administration  and NT 181 Network and Server Operating Systems . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 285 - Routers and Switches I


    This course introduces part one of concepts and procedures required to utilize industry standard switches and routers in multi-protocol internetworks. Topics include exploring router components and their function, configuring routers according to the industry standard operating system (OS), routing fundamentals in a subnetted network infrastructure, and LAN design technologies. The class focuses on the TCP/IP protocol suite and IP addressing in regards to function and importance in a routed environment. Routing protocol basics, such as static and dynamic routing techniques, are covered, with extensive labs and hands-on exercises. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 123 Computer Networks . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 287 - Routers and Switches II


    This course is a continuation of the Routers and Switches I course and is based on current industry standards. The focus of the course will cover topics such as switching basics, intermediate routing, introduction to VLSM (variable length subnet masking), scaling IP addresses, route flapping, RIP version 2, Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol implementation, switching concepts in regards to LAN design, VLAN configuration, and VLAN trunking techniques. The class also explores the leading industry standards associated with WAN communication technologies and design such as ISDN, PPP, and Frame Relay operations. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 285 Routers and Switches I . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 291 - Applied Routers and Switches


    This course reinforces academic knowledge and advanced routing and switching concepts and emphasizes the importance of the critical nature of self-assessment, giving students hands-on experience. The course introduces students to advanced concepts in router and switch design and configurations. Topics include supernetting, VLSM, subnetting, VLANs, interVLAN routing, access lists, technical drawing, troubleshooting networks with routers and switches, and integrating Cisco routers and switches into a Windows networking environment. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 287 Routers and Switches II . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 293 - Linux Application Server


    This course is a study of intermediate to advanced topics regarding Linux server-based applications. Topics include advanced Linux system administration, using Linux as an e-mail server, FTP server, database server, web server, and news server. Topics will also discuss implementing Linux services including DHCP, DNS, NIS, firewall, and network security. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 192 Linux Administration . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 316 - Programming in Linux


    This course presents shell programming in a Linux environment using the Bourne and Bash shells. Topics include Linux tools and utilities, interactive command line programs, programming using constructs, variables, commands, and functions, and debugging processes. 4.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 122 Programming Logic . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 317 - C++ Project


    This course focuses on the development of an application using C++. Topics include user interfaces, database access, current object libraries, good programming practices, development environment, testing, deploying, and supporting C++ applications. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 45.00 Prerequisite: IS 228 C++ Programming . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 318 - C# Programming


    This course provides an introduction to programming in C#. Topics include .NET framework, C# language fundamentals, creating objects in C#, implementing object oriented programming techniques, windows forms and controls, using ADO.NET to access data, using XML Web services, and creating applications. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 223 Object-Oriented Programming 2 . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 321 - Mobile Application Security


    This course will cover a wide breadth of security issues that apply to mobile application environments. The current top issues of mobile security will be analyzed and strategies discussed for each major mobile operating system including Android, Apple iPhone, Windows Mobile, BlackBerry and Symbian OS. The course will also cover security issues pertaining to mobile services such as WAP, Bluetooth, SMS, mobile geolocation, and enterprise security. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 45.00 Prerequisite: IS 128 Object-Oriented Programming 1 . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 323 - Client-Side Website Development


    This course provides instruction in advanced client-side web authoring, including the design and implementation of web pages and websites for popular browsers on desktop and mobile devices using hand-coded HTML and web page authoring tools. Topics include creating websites and web pages, working with HTML, links, and URLs, managing images and text, working with tables, forms, and colors, and using cascading style sheets (CSS) and JavaScript. Graphics topics include using image mapping, animation features, and imported files. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 127 Internet Foundation . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 324 - Introduction to Android Mobile Development


    The goal of this course is to introduce the student to the design and development of mobile software utilizing the Android Operating System and an appropriate Android Java SDK. The setup and configuration of such an environment will be demonstrated and employed. The development tools will be mastered through building an Android application, managing application resources, configuring the manifest file, designing an application framework, implementing a main menu, building forms to collect user input, creating dialogs, and adding application logic that stores state information. 4.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 165 Programming in Java I  or IS 223 Object-Oriented Programming 2 . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 333 - Data Warehousing


    This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of data warehousing and the concepts involved in building a successful data warehouse. Topics include how data warehouses differ from traditional transaction processing systems, the history of data warehousing, and an overview of fundamental data warehousing design principles within the context of relational database systems and their implementation. Oracle Database software is used for illustration and implementation. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 219 Database Concepts and Applications II . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 334 - Introduction to Blackberry Mobile Development


    The goal of this course is to introduce the student to the design and development of mobile software utilizing the BlackBerry Operating System and an appropriate RIM Java SDK. The setup and configuration of such an environment will be demonstrated and employed. The development tools will be mastered through building a Blackberry application, managing application resources, configuring the manifest file, designing an application framework, implementing a main menu, building forms to collect user input, creating dialogs, and adding application logic that stores state information. 4.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 165 Programming in Java I or IS 207 Object-Oriented Programming 2. Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 337 - Mobile Applications Development


    This course will provide an introduction to mobile application development. Native development environments and languages will be presented along with cross-platform environments. Using a cross-platform environment, mobile applications which access native features will be developed. Design, development, testing, and debugging will be covered in addition to building effective user interfaces and dealing with cross-platform issues. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisites: IS 122 Programming Logic  and IS 127 Internet Foundation . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 338 - Software Testing


    This course develops knowledge and skills in the theory and the practice of evaluating, debugging as well as validating software with reference to a model. Basic understanding of the principles and tools used in testing and validating a variety of software systems will be introduced with the ability to work in a team setting in both “open box” and “closed box” scenarios. The testing process will be related to the overall software development lifecycle. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 223 Object-Oriented Programming II Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 341 - Software Engineering I


    This course provides coverage of the major topics in software engineering. Students will learn how to apply software engineering concepts to real-world systems design and development. Topics include software processes, requirements engineering, software design, development, verification, validation, and emerging technologies in software engineering. Project: fully developed system design. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 207 Object-Oriented Programming 2. Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 342 - Software Engineering II


    This course provides coverage of the post-development stages of software engineering and software testing, quality, and maintenance. Students learn how to apply testing throughout the development process to improve the quality of systems and how to use state of-the-art tools for test planning, test design, and defect tracking. Topics include software testing, quality assurance, and software maintenance. Industry leading and state-of-the-art tools are used. Project: fully developed test plan. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 341 Software Engineering I . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 344 - Introduction to iPhone Mobile Development


    The goal of this course is to introduce the student to the design and development of mobile software utilizing the iPhone operating system. After an introduction to objective-C, the setup and configuration of the development environment will be demonstrated and employed. The development tools will be mastered through building an iPhone application, managing application resources, designing an application framework, implementing a main menu, building forms to collect user input, creating dialogs, and adding application logic that stores state information. Access to a Mac is required for this course. 4.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 228 C++ Programming . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 347 - Business Systems Analysis


    This course provides the study of the analysis and design of information systems for business applications. The course concentrates on the systems development process-the analysis. The analysis process provides a strong basis for understanding and modeling the user needs in an information system solution with a business-driven conception. Topics include requirements elicitation, initial proposal, project management, data flow diagramming, agile modeling, data dictionaries, structured decision tables/trees, effective input/output designs, database designs, quality data-entry procedures, and object-oriented concepts. The course does not include any programming of the system or actual layout of the network. Emphasis is placed on the tools and analytical skills required of the systems analyst. The final project of the class aims at producing a professional systems document using most of the analyst’s tools. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 123 Computer Networks . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 354 - Introduction to Symbian Mobile Development


    The goal of this course is to introduce the student to the design and development of mobile software utilizing the Symbian operating system. The setup and configuration of such an environment will be demonstrated and employed. The development tools will be mastered through building a Symbian application, managing application resources, designing an application framework, implementing a main menu, building forms to collect user input, creating dialogs, and adding application logic that stores state information. 4.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 228 C++ Programming . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 364 - Introduction to Windows Mobile Application Development


    The goal of this course is to introduce the student to the design and development of mobile software utilizing the Windows Mobile 7 Operating System and the .NET Compact Framework. The setup and configuration of such an environment will be demonstrated and employed. The development tools will be mastered through building a Windows Mobile application, managing application resources, configuring the manifest file, designing an application framework, implementing a main menu, building forms to collect user input, creating dialogs, and adding application logic that stores state information. 4.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 318 C# Programming . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 391 - Advanced Web Development


    This course explores web development tools and techniques. Students learn server-side and client-side programming technologies and build dynamic web applications. Topics include data validation, state management, integration with files, and relational databases and security. Industry leading and state-of-the-art tools are used. Team project: Fully-functional database-driven website. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisites: IS 127 Internet Foundation  and IS 183 Database Concepts and Applications I . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 420 - Advanced Specialization


    This course is an advanced-level independent study course that allows a student to work on an agreed-upon project from conception through implementation. The student is expected to prepare a proposal and time line prior to beginning the course. The student will explore technology issues related to the project. A written report and oral presentation is expected to complete the course. The student is expected to meet regularly with the instructor to track technical and project-management issues. An ability to work independently is required. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 45.00 Prerequisite: PGPA of 3.00 and written approval of both the faculty advisor and academic dean. Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 421 - Firewall Security


    This course provides instruction in the fundamental theories and practices of firewall operation and management. Topics include deployment planning and installation, and configuration, management, and troubleshooting of both hardware- and software-based firewalls. Mastery of advanced TCP/IP operating principles and associated business practices is required. The lab component covers a wide variety of firewall products and implementation strategies. 4.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 283 Network Security . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 422 - Mobile Game Development


    This course explores the development of interactive games for a variety of mobile devices. Topics include the game development process, graphics, mobile networking for multiplayer games, interface design, and programming. 4.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 223 Object-Oriented Programming 2 . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 424 - Advanced Android Mobile Development


    The goal of this course is to further the student’s knowledge base of Android development and to create robust applications using powerful device features. This will include accessing images and the camera, adding support for location-based services (GPS), implementing network communications, internationalizing the application, developing methodologies for different devices, implementing testing practices for Android applications, and publishing an app in the Android Market for distribution. 4.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 324 Introduction to Android Mobile Development . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 434 - Advanced Blackberry Mobile Development


    The goal of this course is to further the student’s knowledge base of BlackBerry development and to create robust applications using powerful device features. This will include utilizing the PIM interface to access the device’s contacts, telephone numbers, e-mail addresses, and events in the calendar. Network communications will also be covered as well as interfacing to the GPS hardware, internationalizing the application, developing for different devices, implementing testing strategies for different devices, code signing an application, and distributing an application through BlackBerry App World. 4.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 334 Introduction to Blackberry Mobile Development . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 481 - IT Strategic Management


    This course provides a comprehensive guide to information technology strategic management with a focus on the essential components found in an information technology (IT) strategic plan. Topics include the role of an IT manager, IT as a strategic issue, the IT/business strategy relationship, determining a high-level direction for IT, IT strategy gap analysis, option analysis and action plans, IT problem, change, and recovery management strategies, emerging technology evaluation strategies, managing IT functions and resources, and trends affecting IT strategic management. 4.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: Final semester. Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 487 - Database Administration


    The focus of this course is on the foundations of database administration. Topics include managing users, profiles, privileges, and resources, creating operational databases, managing database files, start up and shut down of an instance and database, and managing tablespaces, segments, indexes, extents, and blocks. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 219 Database Concepts and Applications II . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 491 - Capstone Project


    Students work individually or in project teams on an industry-sponsored or instructor-approved project. They will identify a problem, develop design specifications based on stakeholder needs, consider alternative designs, develop a schedule and/or budget, and design, develop, and test the proposed process or product. Interim reports to the sponsor or to the class, a final project report, and a final presentation will be required. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 45.00 Prerequisite: Final semester. Corequisite: None.
  
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    IS 495 - Internship


    This is an elective course in bachelor’s programs that students may take in their final semester. The career internship course is designed for students interested in pursuing a career in the computer science and information technology fields. The outcome of the internship is an informed student fully apprised of the opportunities their program offers for professional growth. During the internship, the student will experience various aspects of working in the actual field in which the student has been educated. The internship is designed to provide the student with the opportunity to experience and participate in duties typical of a contemporary workplace setting. Student learning centers on observing experienced personnel as well as participating in actual hands-on procedures under close supervision of trained professionals. Note: Online students in some states may not be allowed to take this internship due to state restrictions. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 135.00 Prerequisites: Final semester. Corequisite: None.

Information Technology

  
  
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    IS 296 - Python Programming


    This course covers the Python programming language. Topics include the basic elements of programming, variables, assignment statements, built-in data types, conditions, loops, arrays, and I/O. This class covers programming skills such as algorithm development, and program design with functions. It also includes an introduction to object-oriented programming and GUI programming concepts and topics. 3.00 semester credit hours. Contact Hours: 60.00. Prerequisite: IS 122 Programming Logic . Corequisite: None
  
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    IT 100 - Introductory Topics in Information Technology and Software Development


    This course provides an introductory overview to information technology (IT) and software development (SD). Topics include PC hardware, computer networking, OSI model, client and server operating systems, basic virtualization, programming and logic, databases, and basic web authoring. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 45.00 Prerequisites/Corequisites: None.
  
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    IT 120 - Technical Writing


    This course is designed to help students develop skills that will enable them to produce clear and effective scientific and technical documents. Focus will be on basic principles of good writing-which scientific and technical writing shares with other forms of writing-and on types of documents common in scientific and technical fields and organizations. While the emphasis will be on writing, oral communication of scientific and technical information will form an important component of the course, as well. The processes and techniques used to produce manuals and other supporting documents to communicate complex and technical information more easily will be explored. 1.00 semester credit hour. Prerequisite: EN 104 - English Composition I . Corequisites: None.
  
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    IT 122 - Portfolio Development


    This course is intended to provide students the opportunity to develop a foundation upon which to create a portfolio that documents the knowledge, skills and abilities learned during their program of study. The various types of learning artifacts that are commonly used in portfolios, including presentations, diagrams, papers and project summaries will be reviewed. Upon successful completion of the course, students will have built an ePortfolio which they may continue to build upon. 1.00 semester credit hour Contact Hours: 15.00 Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None
  
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    IT 203 - Internet Concepts and Human Computer Interaction


    This course provides an in-depth introduction to the Internet and the World Wide Web as a basis for more advanced studies in Internet technologies and tools, web document publishing, Internet design, and communication protocols including TCP/IP, FTP, HTTP, SMTP, telnet, and the tools that use them. This course will also discuss introductory concepts related to Internet servers and their applications, types of Internet clients, client configuration, security fundamentals, Internet development, databases, HTML, and multimedia. Human computer interaction (HCI), as a discipline concerned with the design, evaluation, and implementation of interactive computing systems for human use and the study of major problems surrounding them, will be discussed. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 123 Computer Networks . Corequisite: None.
  
  
  
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    IT 236 - CCNA Competency Workshop


    This course provides a CCNA competency review of CCNA certification textbook exercises, lab exercises, and exam objectives. This course also includes the preparation and completion of the CCNA exam 640-802. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 291 Applied Routers and Switches . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IT 237 - CCNA Security Competency Workshop


    3.00 Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: NT 213
  
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    IT 331 - Routing and Switching Security


    This course equips students with the knowledge and skills needed to design and support network security in a typical routing and switching topology. The course aims to develop an in-depth understanding of network security principles as well as tools and configurations such as protocol sniffers/analyzers, TCP/IP and common desktop utilities, IOS software, and VPN client software. Topics include access control lists, intrusion prevention systems, IPSec, and virtual private networks. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 285 Routers and Switches I  or NT 215 Routers and Switches . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IT 336 - Information Assurance and Security


    This course develops knowledge and skills in Information Assurance and Security. Students will learn Information Assurance and Security principles; legal and ethical considerations; incident handling and reporting; risk identification and mitigation; security and operations management; security policies; security audits; and information security standards. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 283 Network Security . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IT 337 - Data Storage


    This course develops knowledge and skills in data storage. Students will learn data storage principles, architectures, and implementations. Topics include: storage system principles, architectures, and implementations; storage networking technologies; datacenter environment, storage backup, archive, and replication; cloud computing; and data storage security and infrastructure management. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: NT 181 Network and Server Operating Systems  and IS 192 Linux Administration . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IT 338 - Ethical Hacking


    The threat to systems is one that is continuously changing and evolving. The goal of the ethical hacker is to help organizations take pre-emptive measures against malicious attacks by attacking the system themselves while staying within legal limits. This course will explore the various means that an intruder has available to gain access to the security of a network and various resources. Students will be introduced to penetration testing with the ethics and responsibilities of testing in mind as well as various security attacks to the advanced level. The course will have an intense laboratory component which will be limited to student networks. Foundations in security policy, perimeter defenses, intrusion detection, security monitoring, liability issues, and ethics will be covered. Topics to be covered include, but are not limited to, penetration testing, enumerating, footprinting, scanning, hacking techniques, firewall, IDS, procedural documentation, host reconnaissance Trojans, backdoors, and system attacks such as WLAN, database servers, web servers, and e-mail servers. It must be noted that hacking is a felony in the United States and most other countries. When it is done by request and under a contract between an Ethical Hacker and an organization, it is legal. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: IS 283 Network Security . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IT 346 - Information Technology Project Management


    This course covers techniques and managerial concepts of information technology project management. It prepares students to manage complex information technology projects. Students are introduced to all five major process groups in project management, namely initiating, planning, executing, monitoring, controlling, and closing. Topics include project life cycles, cost benefit analysis, work breakdown structure, staffing, roles, responsibilities, accountability, finance, estimation, budgeting, planning, risk management, scheduling, and tracking. The course also introduces students to computer software for project management. Students will work in teams to design a project plan for a real-world IT project that demonstrates an ability to follow standard project management methodology. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None.
  
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    IT 367 - Network Infrastructure Hardening


    This course offers an in-depth look at TCP/IP, performing volumes of packet captures and analysis, and auditing and generating documentation for hardening procedures. Topics include implementation of IPSec in several different scenarios including a detailed and extensive lesson on securing Linux and Windows network infrastructures. The course will focus on best practices for network design to avoid security breaches and hardening network services such as DNS, DHCP, Directory Services, Operating System Routing, and NAT. Students will also be introduced to securing routers and switches in an infrastructure design as well as professional documentation of network infrastructures. Students will work in teams on a project to demonstrate concepts of hardening a network infrastructure. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: NT 201 Network Infrastructure Administration . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IT 368 - Cloud Computing


    This course develops knowledge and skills in cloud computing. Students will learn cloud computing principles, architectures, and implementations. Topics include cloud computing history, principles, architectures, and implementations, cloud services and solutions, virtualization, network infrastructure and access, data storage, security, end-user access, and standards and compliance. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: NT 306 Virtualization . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IT 372 - Web Security


    This course offers an in-depth look at web application security for students who have some prior understanding of web technologies. There is an in-depth treatment of several significant topics such as user authentication, browser security, business logic, data handling, and distributed threats. The course also covers motivating attacks, defense mechanisms, and security tools and techniques. Emphasis is placed on the skills and abilities for analyzing and documenting web security as a security specialist in order to protect web-related services. Topics include client security, cookies and web beacons, phishing, transaction security-certificates and secure connections, spyware and viruses, man-in-the-middle attacks, server security, denial-of-service attacks, attacks via clients (e.g., zombies and DOS), and DNS poisoning. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisite: NT 371 Web Server Installation and Administration . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IT 381 - Cloud Computing and Virtualization Competency Workshop


    This course provides a cloud computing virtualization competency review of the EMC Cloud Infrastructure Associate-VMWare Certified Professional Certification textbook exercises, lab exercises, and exam objectives. This course also includes the preparation and completion of the EMC E20-002 and VMWare VCP5DT exams. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisites: IT 368 Cloud Computing . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IT 461 - Advanced Security Implementation


    This course examines and explains the technologies required to design, build, and audit a trusted network. Topics include detailed discussions of corporate security culture, the reasons for building and components of a trusted network, and an in-depth look into cryptography, computer forensics law, and legislation, looking at the legalities surrounding networks and network security. Additional topics include a detailed look at biometrics and its applications, strong authentication, and a discussion of two of the cornerstones of trusted networks: digital certificates and digital signatures. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisites: IS 283 Network Security  and NT 201 Network Infrastructure Administration . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IT 471 - Enterprise Security Solution


    This course begins with a discussion of the following: the needs and requirements for building a trusted network, an examination of Certificate Policies and Certificate Practice Statements key to the planning and design of a trusted network, procedures for configuring certificate authorities (CA), both stand-alone and as the root, and the creation and configuration of Certification Authority. Additional topics include management of digital certificates, including their use and configuration on Smart Cards, the procedures available for securing local resources, including documentation of problems and solutions, encryption and biometrics, securing a wireless network in the enterprise, securing e-mail, including the use of S/MIME and PGP, and building a trusted network. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisites: IS 283 Network Security  and NT 201 Network Infrastructure Administration . Corequisite: None.
  
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    IT 491 - Information Technology Capstone Project


    Students work individually or in project teams on an industry-sponsored or instructor-approved project. They will identify a problem, develop design specifications based on stakeholder needs, consider alternative designs, develop a schedule and/or budget, and design, develop, and test the proposed process or product. Interim reports to the sponsor or to the class, a final project report, and a final presentation will be required. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 45.00 Prerequisite: Final semester. Corequisite: None.

Mathematics

  
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    MA 090 - Fundamentals of Mathematics


    This course introduces students to practical mathematics. An emphasis is placed on mastering foundational math concepts while developing conceptual and problem-solving skills. Topics include basic math statements, solving equations, interpreting graphs, solving word problems, basic algebraic concepts, and addition of polynomials. Students who successfully complete this course will have the foundation necessary to succeed in college algebra. 4.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 60.00 Prerequisites/Corequisites: None.
  
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    MA 109 - College Algebra


    This course covers topics of algebra including linear functions, equations, inequalities, systems of equations in two variables, polynomial functions, quadratic equations, and rational and radical equations. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 45. Prerequisite: Required placement score or MA 090 Fundamentals of Mathematics   Corequisite: None.
  
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    MA 204 - Trigonometry


    This course focuses on the concepts of trigonometry. It includes the geometry of triangles, the Pythagorean Theorem, and trigonometric functions and identities. 3.00 semester credit hours Contact Hours: 45.00 Prerequisite: MA 109 College Algebra . Corequisite: None.
 

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